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Monthly Archives: October 2010

Steve Jobs Says No USB 3 ‘At This Time’

appleportsOver the past few months multiple rumors emerged claiming that Apple would adopt USB 3.0 for their line of Macs. Since this is yet to happen, reader, Tom Kruk e-mailed the man in charge asking why he cannot order a Mac with USB 3.0.

Jobs’ Reply:

We don’t see USB 3 taking off at this time. No support from Intel, for example.

According to Jobs USB 3 is not exactly never happening and it looks like they are simply waiting on Intel to adopt the platform. He says Apple does not “see USB 3 taking off at this time” leaving the possibility of Macs with USB 3 for the future. by 9to5mac

 
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Posted by on 30/10/2010 in IT

 

58-inch Table Connect for iPhone multitouch surface easily dwarfs your iPad

table-connect-for-iphoneThink Hyundai’s 70-inch multitouch table concept is hot stuff? Have a gander at this. The Table Connect for iPhone is dangerously close to completion, with a full-on mockup shown above. Put simply, this 58-inch multitouch surface accepts iPhone 4 connections via a 30-pin Dock Connector, and with a bit of magic, the table becomes your iPhone. The crew is currently wrapping up an alpha software release, and while a jailbroken iPhone is obviously necessary to get things going, the end result is bound to be impressive. Or at least hilarious. Here’s hoping these eventually go on sale, but for now, feel free to hit the source link for one more shot and a slew of diagrams. by engadget

 
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Posted by on 30/10/2010 in IT

 

Google TV review

2010-10-29googtvpGoogle’s taking a big leap with Google TV — unlike its competitors, who’ve all focused on delivering curated video content with inexpensive streaming devices, Google’s new platform brings Android, Chrome, and Flash directly to your TV in a variety of hardware configurations from Sony and Logitech. But whether you’re adding Google TV to your existing rig with a Logitech Revue or starting from scratch with a Sony Internet TV, the basic experience of using each product is the same — it’s the web on your TV, in all its chaotic and beautiful glory. Is this the future of television? Can Google do what no company has ever managed to do in the past and put a little PC in your TV? Read on to find out! by engadget

 
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Posted by on 30/10/2010 in IT

 

"Take Me Out" by Atomic Tom LIVE on NYC subway BY iPhone

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Posted by on 28/10/2010 in IT

 

Is Apple About to Cut Out the Carriers?

iphone4-backSources inside European carriers have reported that Apple has been working with SIM-card manufacturer Gemalto to create a special SIM card that would allow consumers in Europe to buy a phone via the web or at the Apple Store and get the phones working using Apple’s App Store.

It’s rumored that Apple and Gemalto have created a SIM card, which is typically a chip that carries subscriber identification information for the carriers, that will be integrated into the iPhone itself. Then customers will then be able to choose their carrier at time of purchase at the Apple web site or retail store, or buy the phone and get their handset up and running through a download at the App Store as opposed to visiting a carrier store or calling the carrier. Either way, it reduces the role of the carrier in the iPhone purchase. Gemalto and Apple have not responded to requests for comment. I’m also waiting to hear back from other sources to get more details.

However, if Apple is doing an end run around the carrier by putting its own SIM inside the iPhone, it could do what Google with its NexusOne could not, which is create an easy way to sell a handset via the web without carrier involvement. Much like it helped cut operators out of the app store game, Apple could be taking them out of the device retail game. Yes, carriers will still have to allow the phone to operate on their networks, which appears to be why executives from various French carriers have been to Cupertino in recent weeks.

The Gemalto SIM, according to my sources, is embedded in a chip that has an upgradeable flash component and a ROM area. The ROM area contains data provided by Gemalto with everything related to IT and network security, except for the carrier-related information. The flash component will receive the carrier related data via a local connection which could be the PC or a dedicated device, so it can be activated on the network. Gemalto will provide the back-end infrastructure that allows service and number provisioning on the carrier network.

The model should work well in Europe, where the carriers tend to use the same networking technology and are far more competitive. It also means that customers can roam more easily with the iPhones, swapping out the carriers as needed. The iPhone has lost its exclusivity in much of Europe and other markets of the world, which makes this model a compelling one for consumers, but a nightmare for carriers. Apple could change the mobile game once again. by gigaom

 
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Posted by on 28/10/2010 in IT

 

Are Apple’s iPhone and iPad relevant to enterprises?

apple-wwdc-2010-285-rm-engThe conventional wisdom is that enterprises aren’t impressed by Apple’s shiny iDevices, perceiving them as a consumer play. Is that a fair assessment? And if so, could it change in the foreseeable future? Let’s take a look, in The Long View …

When it comes to business phones — so the theory goes — BlackBerry and Windows are still top-of-mind. When it comes to larger form factors, businesses supposedly want conventional notebooks, not iPads — but they may be swayed by Windows tablets that are compatible with software they already use. by infoworld

 
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Posted by on 28/10/2010 in IT

 

Vendors join in effort to create SSD PCIe standard

A coalition of top IT vendors today announced the creation of the Solid State Drive (SSD) Form Factor Working Group to create a standard that will allow manufacturers to add a PCIe interface to NAND flash products and significantly boost throughput.

The group hopes that the standard can be used by equipment manufacturers during the second half of 2011, allowing them to offer as much as 2GB/sec throughput between a computer’s processor and an SSD . By comparison, SAS and SATA drives offer 6Gbit/sec and 3Gbit/sec throughput, respectively.

“We’ve seen storage capacity, CPU capacity and memory capacity all rising, but the storage interface has remained relatively static,” said Jim Pappas, director of technology initiatives at Intel and a member of the working group. “Bringing this PCIe interface in will close that gap … and we’ll have much, much better IOPS as a result,”

The new working group is being manned by employees from most of the companies that created the PCIe standard, including Intel , Dell, and IBM. The one PCIe contributor absent from the group is Hewlett Packard.

Storage vendors EMC and Fujitsu are also part of the collaboration. SSD, controller and storage subsystem vendors, including Micron, Molex, Emulex, SandForce, FusionIO, QLogic, IDT, and Marvell, are also contributing expertise to the group. by itnews

 
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Posted by on 28/10/2010 in IT