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Daily Archives: 03/02/2013

CamRanger Lets You Wirelessly Control Your DSLR Using an iPhone, iPad

CamRanger is an accessory for your Canon or Nikon camera that lets you wirelessly control most camera functions using your iPhone, iPad, or Mac.
CamRanger is a stand-alone device that connects to select Canon or Nikon DLSR cameras with a provided USB cable. It creates an ad-hoc WiFi network that your iPad, iPhone, or iPod touch can then connect to. The free CamRanger iOS app then enabled control of the camera. There is no need for a computer or existing Internet connection.
FEATURE HIGHLIGHTS:
Capture & View Images
Capture images in all drive modes. Then view full resolution images in JPG or Canon RAW and optionally save to an iPad, iPhone, or iPod Touch. CamRanger is a great wireless tethering solution.
Live View
Wirelessly stream live view to your iPad, iPhone, or iPod Touch. Complete focusing control with touch focus, incremental adjustments, and focus stacking.

View & Edit Camera Settings
Remotely change and view camera settings: Aperture, Shutter Speed, ISO, White Balance, Drive/Shooting Mode (Single, Continuous, etc.), AF, Metering Mode, Image Format, Auto Exposure Mode, and Exposure Compensation and Bracketing.
Record Movies
Wirelessly record movies to view and edit later. CamRanger supports touch focusing during movie recording for many Nikon and Canon cameras.
Intervalometer / HDR
Setup intervalometer (time lapse) or HDR on your CamRanger. No need for your iOS device to remain connected after the initial setup.
Macro & Focus Stacking
Perfect for macro photography where your camera is in awkward locations or very precise focus control is needed. Use automatic focus stacking for enhanced depth of field.
The CamRanger is selling for a promotional price of $299 at the link below.

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Posted by on 03/02/2013 in IT

 

Typing ‘File:///’ Will Crash Almost Any Mac Application

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An interesting bug in OS X Mountain Lion causes almost all Mac apps to crash when typing in ‘File:///’, according to a Radar report spotted by 9to5Mac.
The crash is thought to be caused by Spell Checker and affects numerous apps including: Safari, TextEdit, Console, Messages, Xcode, TweetBot, Chrome, and others.
The bug does not affect Lion or Snow Leopard.

 
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Posted by on 03/02/2013 in IT

 

Alt-week 2.2.13: SpaceLiners, building a brain and the man made multiverse

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What’s black and white, and read all over? This week’s dose of sci-tech news, silly. What is less black and white, however, IS where reality ends, and the stuff of science fiction begins. Europe to Australia in 90 minutes? Automatically-melting military technology? A material that hosts multiple universes? It’s all here, it’s all alt-week.

If the highlight of your long-haul is that leg-stretching trip to the bathroom, the bad news is that’s a situation not likely to change any time soon. But, that doesn’t mean they aren’t working on it. If recently announced estimates are to be believed, the hypersonic SpaceLiner that would reduce the journey time from Europe to Australia down to just 90 minutes is about 50 years out. The ESA-supported project started in 2005, and would use a propellant based on liquid oxygen and hydrogen. The craft will likely launch vertically from a booster — just like NASA rockets — with up to 50 passengers onboard. Once an altitude of around 50 miles is reached, the SpaceLiner would “glide” down to its destination, reaching speeds of up to 15,000 mph while it did so. And here is the problem. Creating a design that is capable of tolerating the heat generated at such speeds, that is also consistent with the rest of its consumer requirements is quite a challenge. Still, we’re content with the in-flight movie choice, and the occasional stroll down the aisle while they work on it.

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Posted by on 03/02/2013 in IT

 

BlackBerry 10 doesn’t need a special data plan

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With BlackBerry 10 devices wending their way into the hands of patient fans, there’s been some uncertainty as to just what service plans customers need to reach the new platform’s full potential. The short answer, after confirmations at CrackBerry: just about any of them. Unlike older BlackBerrys, the Z10 and future models don’t require tiers with BlackBerry Internet Service or BlackBerry Enterprise Server support in order to work their push messaging magic. Those migrating from a regular BlackBerry plan won’t have to worry about switching, though. The lone exceptions are subscribers who have barebones, social-only plans where BIS serves as the filter. While the switch could lead to price hikes for those cost-conscious users, it’s otherwise good news for BlackBerry devotees who’ve wanted the same choice in service as the rest of their smartphone-owning peers by engadget

 
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Posted by on 03/02/2013 in IT

 

Vodafone brings fiber optics to the Shard, gives you signal high above London

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What good is a spectacular view if you can’t use your phone to tell people about it? London’s newly opened 95-story skyscraper, The Shard, measures 1,016 feet, making it the tallest building in the European Union. From the 69th and 72nd floors, you can get 360 degree views of the city, up to 40 miles out, according to the building’s owners. But what happens when the 200 people who can fit on the platforms at any one time want to user their mobile devices? Vodafone’s implemented a fiber optic system that converts signal into light, allowing it to travel upwards at a rate of 100GB per second. Once they’ve hit the proper spots, its converted into a radio signal, which is then beamed to several antennas located on different floors. More information — and some cool imagery — can be found in the source link below. by engadget

 
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Posted by on 03/02/2013 in IT

 

Google Chromebooks now in 2,000 schools, usage doubled in three months

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Google has really ramped up its education efforts lately, and it looks like it’s paid off: according to the Mountain View company, its Chromebooks are now in use in 2,000 schools, which is twice as many as there were three months ago. Three of the more recent participants include Transylvania County Schools in North Carolina with 900 devices, St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Florida with 2,200 and the Rocketship Education charter network in the Bay Area with 1,100. The education team has been making efforts in the global community as well, with cloud-promoting appearances at various education conferences such as the Florida Education Technology Conference in Orlando and the British Education Training and Technology show in the UK. We’re not sure exactly which flavor of Chromebook the students are getting their hands on, but we’re sure no matter what they use, they’ll grow up well-versed in what could be the future of computing. by engadget

 
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Posted by on 03/02/2013 in IT

 

Kodak closes its digital imaging patent sale, settles disputes

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Kodak has had many scary moments in its recent history, not the least of which was wondering whether or not it could sell digital imaging patents to help escape bankruptcy. It’s putting some of that trauma to rest now that it has officially closed the recently approved sale. The $527 million deal shares 1,100 patents with a complex web of companies, including Apple and Google, operating under alliances led by Intellectual Ventures and RPX. The buyers intend to use the patents as defenses against imaging-related lawsuits, and they’ve agreed to settle any remaining legal entanglements with Kodak in the process. Kodak still stands to gain the most from the deal, however: the cash helps repay a large chunk of a key loan, and it reassures the potential financiers that the company needs to leave bankruptcy by mid-2013. We still won’t get back the Kodak we once knew, but the name will at least soldier on. by engadget

 
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Posted by on 03/02/2013 in IT

 
 
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