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Nikon’s full-frame D610 DSLR is a minor step up from the D600

09 Oct

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It’s been just over a year since Nikon announced the D600. The company’s compact full-frame camera delivered a ton of power for $2,100, and it’s still a top option for photographers looking for a new DSLR. Still, for one reason or another, Nikon’s figured it’s time to refresh its high-end body, with the nearly identical D610. There’s still a 24.3-megapixel FX sensor, an EXPEED 3 processor, a 25,600 top ISO, dual SD card slot, 39-point autofocus and a 921k-dot 3.2-inch LCD. The improvements, while relatively minor for most users, may be fairly significant for certain professionals. The most appealing addition is a quiet continuous mode. After activating it by selecting Qc on the mode sub dial, you’ll be able to shoot at up to 3 fps with limited mechanical noise. Additionally, the traditional continuous mode has been boosted from 5.5 fps to 6. There are minor white balance improvements with the D610, too, enabling improved skin tone reproduction when shooting in artificial light.

We spent a few minutes with the D610 body, but Nikon reps didn’t permit us to power on the unit. Unfortunately that means we were unable to evaluate the new quiet continuous mode — pros that plan to shoot with this setting regularly, be it at a wedding or on a movie set, should definitely test Qc out in a store before ordering this slightly tweaked model. The housing and control placement is identical here, with the exception of the Qc offering on the sub mode dial. You also have an identical set of ports available — there’s still no built-in WiFi, so if you have a $60 WU-1b wireless adapter hanging around, you’ll be able to use it to get connected here, too. The Nikon D610 will be available later this month for $2,000 (body only), $2,600 with a 24-85mm f/3.5-4.5 lens, $3,050 with a 28-300mm f/3.5-5.6 lens or $3,250 with the 24-85, a 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6, WU-1b, a bag and a 32GB SD card. by engadget

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Posted by on 09/10/2013 in IT

 

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